Choovie
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Choovie Finding bums for empty cinema seats
  • Internet Business
  • Media and Entertainment
  • Mobile Apps
  • A$294,250

    invested

  • 117.7% funded

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  • 8.3% - 20.3%

    min - max equity offered

  • A$250,000.00 - A$700,000.00

    min - max investment sought

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OFFER IS CLOSED
Potential to extend IP

Hi Guys, great work, I'm considering investing too.

I see you've indicated that the principal could be extended to theatre shows. What about airlines?

Cheers, WIll

Will Bennett posted on 12.08.2018

Thanks Will! Excellent question.

Airlines is probably one we will leave alone for the time being. Like hotels, airlines have been pretty good at pursuing pricing strategies that maximise their revenues. So rather than looking to places where the model isn't as unique, we will look to those areas where the opportunity is yet to be exploited. This includes theatre as you mention and also zoo's, museums, bowling alleys, exhibitions. There's too many to mention! We will be busy!

Shane Thatcher posted on 13.08.2018

Replied to Will Bennett

Technology Risk ...part 2

Hi,

I was more referring more to the Risk of the underlying IP - and knowledge "ownership" and redundancy.

I cant ascertain any 'pure" - ie code level - Technology skills as part of the senior management or ownership group.

SCOTT HYDE posted on 09.08.2018

Hi Scott,

We own all the IP associated with the algorithms and the platform itself, and we are working with our lawyers as to the best way to protect that going forward. Re pure tech skills in our ownership group, Choovie's Angel Investor is Chris Morris who founded share registry business Computershare in the 1970's. As part of his involvement with Choovie, he brought with him some of the best tech people in the country who provide a full array of tech services to all his businesses, including parking tech, casino's, pubs & resorts.

I hope that helps

Shane

Shane Thatcher posted on 09.08.2018

Replied to SCOTT HYDE

Technology Risk ...In light of importance of dynamic pricing model

You mention that the risk of "volume" in terms of technology risk.

In my experience modern systems should have no issue with very considerable scale especially after "> 1m RD spend."

is this really your {only} technology risk?

SCOTT HYDE posted on 07.08.2018

Hi Scott,

Yes, you are right, we are not worried about scale particularly as we have built everything in such a way as to take this into account. However, there is always some uncertainty until it is proven in reality.

The other risks from a technology perspective are not with our platform as such but with integrated systems, that we don't control. We integrate with cinema ticketing systems for example, and if they go down, we cannot sell a ticket (neither can the cinema). We also rely on the accuracy of data inputs from external sources and the reliability of external systems for things like payments.

I hope that helps, and please keep the questions coming!

Cheers

Shane

Shane Thatcher posted on 08.08.2018

Replied to SCOTT HYDE

Question regarding Dynamic Priciing

Hello
so to clarify - you do have a dynamic pricing model/ algorithms?
conceptually based on what inputs? Im not expecting IP released of course.
Real-time using serverless cloud functionality?

I'm interested in this statement i.e. perishable inventory, variable demand etc.....and applicability outside cinemas....

thanks

SCOTT HYDE posted on 07.08.2018

Hi Scott,

Thanks for your interest, and it's fabulous to have a question on dynamic pricing - my favourite subject.

Yes, we have a proprietary model which can determine a demand-based ticket price for any movie session in Australia in real-time. We built the model from scratch. The key variables are when the movie is playing (time of day/day of week/time of year) and the popularity of the movie. Plus there are also some minor variables.

The model could be applied to other industries where inventory is perishable, such as bowling alleys, museums etc..The seed model demand profiles will be different but other than that it is actually a little easier because one key causes of demand variability in cinema - the movie itself - changes all the time. A bowling alley, on the other hand, is always a bowling alley! So the demand factors are more constant.

We are hoping to run some trials in the exhibition space using the platform later this year.

I hope that helps, and let me know if you have any other questions.

Cheers

Shane

Shane Thatcher posted on 07.08.2018

Replied to SCOTT HYDE

Small clarification

2.14, under number of cinema partners I assume the last column is 2020 not 2019

Jimmy Guo posted on 02.08.2018

Thanks, Jimmy, great spotting. You are correct.

Cheers

Shane

Shane Thatcher posted on 03.08.2018

Replied to Jimmy Guo

Limited to only movie tickets

Hello,

I have just come back from New York where one can buy last minute Broadway tickets, and tickets for other events relatively easily online or through a reseller. As soon as I came across Choovie here on Equitise I thought it was a great idea. Will you only be limiting yourselves to cinema though? Did you think about also selling other tickets on the platform?

thanks and all the best with the offer!

Phil Bright posted on 12.07.2018

Hi Phil,

Thanks very much for your great question. We do indeed have intentions to use the platform to sell other tickets. We can adapt the platform to any industry which has similar characteristics to cinema - i.e. perishable inventory, variable demand etc., Some examples of such industries to add to your thoughts, are museums, zoos, and bowling alleys. We've designed the system architecture in such a way as it is relatively simple to adjust the algorithms to reflect different demand profiles, so extensive development work is not required. We have plenty on our plate at present, so we won't be looking at it in the short-term, but it is absolutely on our radar, and we have already had some conversations with groups in these industries who have expressed interest in our technology.

Thanks again, and have a wonderful day.

Shane Thatcher posted on 13.07.2018

Replied to Phil Bright

Exit strategy

Thank you for your detailed answers to my first questions. Those were very helpful. I've got a couple more hard questions:

1. Looking at the data and targets on Page 38:

You're aiming for 7,500 active Chooviegoers by 30/05/19 buying 8 tickets per year. At ~$1.30 per ticket this gives $78,000 AUD per year "effective" revenue. (7500 users x 8 tickets x $1.30 per year).

Your projections for 2020 with the same purchases and 30,000 users would give ~$312,000 per year.

Some of the costs you've mention would roughly add up as follows:
- $6000 per month on server and ongoing app costs = $72k per year. (I do see there are AWS credits here)
- Future app development ($25k)
- CEO & COO compensation = $150k per year.
- Future staff
- Advertising/marketing

The costs vs. revenue here seems quite high as it seems you'd be running at a loss until at least ~15,000 active chooviegoers - assuming the tickets sold per year is accurate.

Please correct me if my assumptions and napkin calculations above are wrong.

Which leads me to...

2. What is the exit strategy for Equitise investors? Could you explain how a $1,000 investment will get a return on investment? Dividends? Private sale, IPO, or something else? What's the expected timeframe on this?

Thanks!

Andrew Smith posted on 09.07.2018

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for your continued interest and additional questions.

1. We intend to focus our available resources on areas that will increase the unit economics of each user in addition to increasing our total user base. Within the first couple of years, we plan to match or exceed the base gross margin (effective revenue) per customer via additional revenue streams. Therefore, your calculations are largely correct except that we intend to double the gross margin to more like $600k, and the cost side of the equation will obviously depend on the ongoing cost to acquire/activate customers and the technology investments which are undertaken. To this final point, we are seeking a steep growth in the value of the business so we will lean towards investments, which fulfil this goal best.

Which leads us to your next question.

2. Exit Strategy – Firstly it is important for us to be totally transparent and ensure everyone understands a startup business, by its nature, is relatively illiquid in the short term. You should probably think of this as a 3 to 4-year investment. That said there are a couple of ways we will pursue for investors to exit their shareholdings. The first as you say is by a potential IPO, which could occur by Year three.

The second (and more likely) possibility is through a trade sale where another large organisation chooses to buy some or all of Choovie. Obviously, at this stage we have no idea if this will happen or if the Board would assess the offer to be to the benefit of shareholders. We have, however, already identified a number of potential buyers for the business and are establishing these relationships to ensure we have a good chance at execution should the opportunity arise.

If we can hit our targets re partner cinemas, Active Chooviegoers etc., and the introduction of additional revenue streams we think an exit of 10X or greater is achievable for investors in this round.

The depth and engagement shown by these questions is greatly appreciated, Andrew.

Cheers

Shane Thatcher posted on 10.07.2018

Replied to Andrew Smith

Competition

Hi. I have few questions regarding your offer.

1. In your Offer Document you do not discuss subscription based services for cinemas, which also provide cinema tickets at lower prices. In Australia, there is Sinemia offering 1 ticket per month for $5, which is half of your average price. Don't you think that a budget focused customer may opt for that offer rather than Choovie?

2. Could you provide a range for Choovie ticket prices as average price is less informative?

3. Did you estimate how much additional revenue your service provides to cinemas in the last few months?

Jakub Zlotowski posted on 04.07.2018

Hi Jacob,

Thanks very much for your interest in Choovie and for some great questions. See our responses to your queries below.

1. Subscription services definitely have their place in the cinema landscape as they provide an alternate offering to standard arrangements as long as they are based on economically sustainable business models. We do see a few key issues with the current incarnations:

a) They are losing a lot of money as their model involves the company paying full-price for each ticket to the cinema whilst the customer gets a significant discount. See this article for a discussion on Moviepass in the USA - https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-05-08/moviepass-owner-s-cash-runs-low-as-9-95-monthly-deal-takes-toll.

b) Subscription services don’t really tackle the problem of the volatility in attendance between sessions, i.e. Saturdays are packed, Wednesdays empty. In fact they may exacerbate the problem; driving more customers, (paying a lower price), into higher demand sessions. Choovie’s model is an economically efficient solution for both cinemas and customers as it does not reduce revenue in high demand sessions, and drives increased attendance in lower demand sessions. In fact, we think the combination of a subscription model and Choovie’s demand-based pricing may provide an excellent proposition. Speaking specifically of Sinemia’s entry into Australia, we are a little in the dark as to its model and the level of engagement of its claimed cinema partners. I would direct you to their Australian Facebook page for more information.

2. Choovie tickets range from $6 to $23 depending on the venue, movie and session time.

3. Cinema revenues are notoriously difficult to judge month on month or year on year as they are so dependent on the quality and popularity of the content on the screen. However, our best measure to date is one cinema partner who has indicated that he has experienced a 6% increase in sales due to coming on board with Choovie. Note that cinema is largely a fixed-cost business so each additional dollar of revenue goes straight to the bottom line from a profitability perspective.

Again, thanks very much for taking the time to get in touch and let us know if you need anything further.

Shane Thatcher posted on 04.07.2018

Replied to Jakub Zlotowski

Profit per ticket sold

Hi! Choovie looks really interesting, congratulations on reaching this point. I've got a few questions after reading the Offer Document:

1. Could you please clarify how much revenue goes into Choovie's pocket after the cinema's cut (effectively the profit per ticket sold). Is it $1.25 to $1.40 per ticket sold? (page 14).

2. In addition to above, when you're quoting revenue of over $100,000 on page 11, is that into Choovie's pocket, or is that before the Cinema cut. I.e. Does $100,000 revenue mean $12,000 - $15,000 revenue to Choovie after the Cinema's cut?

3. What are your ongoing costs for servers and app development? What will they be in the following years?

4. How much do payment providers (e.g. eWay) eat into revenue? Is this factored into the revenue per ticket?

5. How do you define "active" Chooviegoers?

Thanks. All the best with the offer!

Andrew Smith posted on 04.07.2018

Hi Andrew,

Thanks so much for your kind remarks, for giving the offer consideration in such detail and taking the time to ask some insightful questions. See answers to your queries below.

1. Currently, the margin varies between $1.25 and $1.40 depending on the venue. We see this as the start of our revenue development – it gives us a friction-free entry to the space and serves to build a solid customer and revenue base. Once this is in place we will have the opportunity to extend the value derived from the platform. Our relationships with, and understanding of, our customers gives us the opportunity to market specific movies directly to engaged movie-fans. Distributors have marketing budgets set aside for each movie and are willing to pay for such promotion. We are already in conversations with distributors along these lines. Additionally, given the nature of our technology, we can engage with customers when they are “primed” for a purchase from the candy-bar. This puts us in a perfect position to promote candy-bar related special offers. This capability is attracting interest from candy-bar suppliers as an additional marketing route. Finally, we are already providing Digital Services, i.e. e-commerce websites to smaller cinemas without this capability; this provides a valuable opportunity to transact directly with non-chooviegoers. I hope this gives you the insight you’re after re our current and planned models, obviously we can’t guarantee our future revenue model intentions

2. You’re correct! We transact directly with the customer, so the total revenue from the sale is our total revenue. From there we pay the cinema the “model agreed” amount for each ticket once we hit settlement date.

3. This largely depends on what additional development we undertake. Our underlying costs without additional development are about $6k per month however, a large chunk of this is for Amazon Web Services, for which we have around $60k worth of credits to allocate. We do however; have some exciting additions to the platform, which we intend on rolling out over the coming months that help to increase our revenue generating opportunities. These include 1) pre-sales of candy-bar items; 2) seat selection; and 3) “split” payments. In “full development mode” our costs increase to around $25k. Of course, we consider the cost only if justified by projected revenue growth.

4. eWay charge 2.6% for each transaction, is implicit in our margin and factored into revenue per ticket. We are currently in negotiations with PayPal to provide an additional option to our customers and potentially a better price. The current price was negotiated “pre-revenue”. As our volumes rise our ability to access an improved arrangement increases substantially. We expect that the overall cost per ticket of credit card fees to fall significantly as volumes rise. We also are looking to restructure the fees so we have an option that better suits the (unusual) situation when we get a high value ticket.

5. Great question! We define “Active Chooviegoers” as those who have purchased a ticket on the platform. We expect the % of Active Chooviegoers to increase as we gain more cinema partners. Whilst we try very hard to target movie-fans in locations where we have a partner cinema, our good PR has given us several thousand Chooviegoers in locations where we do not currently have a cinema. As these customers have already expressed a strong interest in the platform, they are generally easy to activate once they have a “local” Choovie cinema. Our forward projections are for Active Choovegoers to make up around 25% of our total number of Chooviegoers, and this matches our current of around 4000.

Thanks again for you thoughts and please don't hesitate if you have any additional questions.

Shane Thatcher posted on 04.07.2018

Replied to Andrew Smith

  • > Offer Type: Australian Retail (CSF) Offer This offer is open to Retail and Wholesale/Sophisticated investors in Australia. Whilst in New Zealand the offer is open to Wholesale investors.
  • > Company: Choose Entertainment Ltd Securities purchased are for direct equity in Choose Entertainment Ltd.
  • > Security Type: Ordinary Shares
  • > Fees Paid by Issuer: 6% of funds raised Upon successful completion of this funding round a total of 6% of capital raised will be paid by the Issuer to Equitise.
  • > Cooling-Off Rights: 5 working days - Retail investors in Australia are able to withdraw their applications for securities with accordance to the Australian Crowd Source Funding (CSF) regulations. For more information please click on the link supplied.
    More Info
  • > Related Parties: None

More detailed information about this offer is contained in this Offer Document

Offer Document
Offer overview

 

The Company is offering 250,000 to 700,000 ordinary shares under the following terms:

1. Anti-dilution clause from second Angel round results in an issue of additional shares to each investor.
2. Sonya Stephen invested $106,000 in SAFE Notes with 0% discount (106,000 shares) and Livo Pty Ltd invested $50,000 in SAFE Notes at 20% discount (62,500 shares). SAFE Notes convert to ordinary shares with this Offer and do not dilute incoming shareholders.

The Offer opened privately through the Equitise platform on 26 June 2018 and publicly on 10 July 2018. The Offer is scheduled to close at 12 am (AEST) on 15 August 2018.

Executive summary

 

WHAT IS CHOOVIE

 

Choovie exists so that movie fans get to see more movies the way they are made to be seen; in the cinema. Conceived in 2015 and launched in April 2017, Choovie is a revolutionary, independent digital platform, combining dynamic pricing with consumer data to match active moviegoers with empty cinema seats.

 

Choovie provides customers with a cheaper, easier, and more engaging experience, whilst maximising profits for cinemas at no cost or risk, and with minimal effort. Similar to airline pricing models, Choovie’s algorithms optimise ticket prices to increase cinema occupancy and revenue.

 

Put simply, Choovie puts more bums on empty seats.

 

 

 

THE CHOOVIE PLATFORM

 

Choovie’s bespoke technology combines real-time data and consumer analysis with automated, digital communications to ensure the customer gets the right ticket offer, at the right time, at the right price.

 

Choovie makes a margin from each ticket sold via the platform. As the Choovie customer base grows, additional revenue streams are becoming available, such as content marketing on behalf of distributors and partners, and developing a digital presence for our cinema partners.

 

Choovie is a genuine win-win, customers get to see more movies for less, cinemas fill empty seats, and revenue increases right along the value chain.

Milestones & History

 

 

ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE

 

Choovie is rapidly gaining traction with audiences and partner cinemas, proving its business model, and gaining a substantial subscriber base to attract major cinema operators. The first 14 months of Choovie’s operation have also been successful in proving key elements of the Choovie proposition and business model, which includes driving change in the ticket purchasing behaviours of moviegoers.

 

Business model

 

 

THE EMPTY SEATS PROBLEM (CINEMAS ARE NOT ALONE)

 

Cinemas, like hotels and airlines, have perishable inventory. A seat that fails to sell today cannot be stored and sold tomorrow. In addition, also like airlines and hotels, the majority of cinemas’ costs are fixed. The cost to run a movie session is pretty much the same whether there are 100 or 2 people in the audience.

 

These characteristics have led airlines and hotels to adopt highly flexible and personalised pricing models, in order to increase asset utilisation and hence maximise their revenue and occupancy.

 

Cinema, on the other hand, operates at an average occupancy of 17%.

 

 

USING DYNAMIC PRICING, CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY & DATA

 

Demand-based (dynamic) pricing means that the price for a good or service is to a degree determined by the demand for the good or service. It is a proven theoretical method of maximising revenues used in a multitude of industries, including ride sharing, airlines, and hotels.

 

To date, it has had limited application in cinema. The demand for movie sessions varies dramatically. Some sessions are full to capacity, whilst others are deserted. The reasons for this variation include the movie itself, how long it has been running, the time of day, the day of the week, and many more.

 

Choovie identifies and analyses the key factors, and determines a demand appropriate price for every movie session, at every cinema in Australia.

 

Choovie not only provides market-leading movie search technology, it understands its subscribers’ movie preferences and habits, and, importantly, their location and crafts specific communications designed to induce ticket purchase.

 

 

REVENUE MODEL

 

Choovie is a marketplace where customers can buy cinema tickets from a variety of venues. Choovie has arrangements in place to “buy” tickets as required (i.e. when they are purchased by Chooviegoers) from its partner cinemas in amounts determined by the cinema partners pre-set parameters. Choovie chooses the price at which a ticket appears on the platform and this price includes the ticket price plus a pre-set margin.

 

Generally, Choovie adds a margin that is in line with cinema online booking fees, and currently, this varies between $1.25 and $1.40. This sets Choovie’s gross margin at approximately 12% to 15% of revenue.

 

Clipping a margin from each ticket sold is the first of many revenue opportunities that may become available as the Choovie platform gains traction. Choovie’s user base and its unique understanding of that user base gained through data may be of value in the future.

Strategy & Vision

 

 

CUSTOMER ACQUISITION STRATEGY

 

Approximately 70% of people in Western countries attend the cinema at least once a year. Therefore, Choovie is not “selling” a new service. It is improving a service that most people already use by delivering it at a lower price and in an easier way. Faced with such a proposition, at the right time and in the right way, most movie fans buy more tickets.

 

Choovie's primary subscriber acquisition channels are:

 

Partnerships

Developing partnerships with organizations with existing databases of relevant demographics is the fastest way to grow Choovie’s subscriber base. The nature of Choovie’s offering provides considerable scope for the development of such partnerships, and Choovie has been successful in engaging some of Australia’s largest and most progressive organizations.

 

Public Relations

The Choovie proposition has proved to be very “newsworthy”. This attention has directly lead to increases in subscribers and ticket sales, providing Choovie with significant brand recognition that will prove valuable as Choovie grows.

 

Social Media & Online

Social media provides a direct and effective avenue for Choovie to pursue new subscribers, and re-engage existing subscribers. Facebook has proven to be the most effective channel for attracting customers interested in the Choovie offering. Choovie also has an active presence on Instagram and Twitter for brand profile purposes.

 

 

CINEMA ACQUISITION STRATEGY

 

Securing ticket supply with sufficient volume and geographic spread is critical to Choovie’s success. The Choovie platform's design and build was cognisant of this necessity, as has been Choovie’s strategic entry into the Australian market:

 

No Cost, No Risk & Minimal Effort

The design of the Choovie platform and business model are such that there are no barriers to entry or exit for cinema partners. Becoming a Choovie partner has no up-front cost, presents no risk (no locked-in contract) and requires no effort (fully automated process).

 

Prove, Communicate, Prove Again

Once a Chooviegoer converts into a buyer, they spend an average of $126 p/a on cinema tickets. This compares to an Australia-wide annual average of around $50. Choovie is increasing customers cinema spend.

 

Data Sharing

On Choovie, all transactions occur between Choovie and the customer, and Choovie shares transactional data with the cinema. This allows cinemas to keep control of their customers.

 

Wider-Industry Support

Choovie has sought and received support from major distribution companies active in Western markets.

 

 

INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION STRATEGY

 

In the same way that Choovie’s beta stage in 2017 paved the way for wider adoption in Australia during 2018, Choovie’s wider adoption in 2018 will pave the way for Choovie’s launch into European markets in 2019.

 

Choovie’s medium-term expansion plans include launching in the Republic of Ireland and New Zealand in 2019, and the United Kingdom in 2020. The expectation is that operations will occur from two major offices, in Australia and (likely) Ireland or United Kingdom.

 

These target markets combined account for over US$2B per year in box office returns. Expectations are that each will see a shift toward online sales of more than 10% per year in the next 5 years. This, coupled with the fact that these markets have similar characteristics to Australia, i.e. high-ticket prices, and low occupancy rates; make them perfect targets for the first phase of Choovie’s overseas expansion.

Risks facing the Business

 

Below is a description of the main risks facing the Company. Only the risks that the Company considers may significantly impact the success or failure of the business have been included.

 

For a detailed breakdown of the key risks please see section 2.15 of the Offer Document.

 

Use of funds

 

 

Funds raised under this program will be used to increase Choovie’s user base, expand overseas and extend the platforms capabilities.

 

In particular, the funds will be used to do the following:

Financial summary

 

For a full breakdown of the financials for Choovie please see section 2.12 of the Offer Document.

 

1. Other Income includes the 2016/17 R&D Tax Incentive rebate, and shareholder loans provided to the Company to aid with cashflow and forgiven during the 2017/18 tax year.

2. Other Expenses include those eligible for a rebate under the R&D Tax Incentive Scheme, including IT Development, General Expenses and Staff Costs.

 

1. Current Assets includes provisions for the receipt of 2017/18 R&D Tax Incentive rebate (due August 2018) and Amazon Web Services credits which will be utilised over the coming 6 to 12 months.

2. To date approximately $1.1 million has been spent building the Choovie platform and related infrastructure. This amount has been accounted for as an expense so the accounts are consistent with the Research and Development Tax Incentive requirements. Therefore, according to AASB 138, no value can be attributed to the platform on the Balance Sheet.

3. Current Liabilities includes amounts outstanding to Choovie's technology partner, Tangible Technologies which is wholly owned by Chris Morris, Choovie's Angel Investor.

4. Non Current Liabilities includes a loan from Rockinghorse against Choovie's 2017/18 R&D Tax Rebate to expedite technology development and optimise the rebate, and a shareholder loan to optimise cashflow.

Shane Thatcher

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Sonya Stephen

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Vejune Zemaityte

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Will Barber

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Janhavi Gohil

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Choovie CSF Offer Document

This is the Choovie CSF Offer Document as at 26 June 2018.

Download

The investors below have committed capital to the business in this funding round.

Samtrekforchoovie

14-08-2018

ZDC

14-08-2018

WILD BRUMBY

14-08-2018

CC GIBBO

14-08-2018

SCOTT HYDE

14-08-2018

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William Chen

14-08-2018

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Andris Dinsbergs

14-08-2018

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Lungii

14-08-2018

PK

14-08-2018

Christopher O'Brien

13-08-2018

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JL

13-08-2018

Gmak

13-08-2018

willo5845

13-08-2018

Leeor Groen

13-08-2018

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Luke Lawler

13-08-2018

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Ramchandra Dahal

13-08-2018

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Stuart Lane

13-08-2018

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Shiva Sajjanapu

13-08-2018

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Zachary Zdrinis

13-08-2018

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Kreisler

13-08-2018

Roberto Azcui Aparicio

12-08-2018

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Nick Barr

12-08-2018

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Anthony McInnes

12-08-2018

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Cassey Whitney

12-08-2018

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10x

12-08-2018

Will Bennett

12-08-2018

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Aaron Sinclair

12-08-2018

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Alya Stephen

12-08-2018

PATRICK LEONG

12-08-2018

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RosieBetsie

12-08-2018

Likewiseaxe

12-08-2018

Siraj Doctor

11-08-2018

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Evan Jewell

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Jak Nicholls

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Ellis Lee

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MARTYN WILLIAMS

10-08-2018

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Chloe King

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Penny

10-08-2018

Stuart Cran

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Dean Fergie

10-08-2018

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Jason Salerno

09-08-2018

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JH

09-08-2018

Allan Guatlo

09-08-2018

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Brett Webster

09-08-2018

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Andy

08-08-2018

Horse-Tamer

07-08-2018

Stephen Breen

07-08-2018

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Tim Constantine

04-08-2018

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EP David

03-08-2018

Jennifer Hutchison

02-08-2018

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Simon Bunn

01-08-2018

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GM

31-07-2018

Tamara Baker

31-07-2018

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Ray

30-07-2018

M

27-07-2018

Christopher

26-07-2018

Philippa Benson

22-07-2018

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Polly

22-07-2018

Choovie Groovie

20-07-2018

JenCho

19-07-2018

Mark Brennand

19-07-2018

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Greg Carter

18-07-2018

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Matthew Mees

18-07-2018

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Ellison Bloomfield

18-07-2018

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Cinema devotee

18-07-2018

Mary

18-07-2018

David M

18-07-2018

Michael Harris

17-07-2018

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CL

17-07-2018

Israel Folau

17-07-2018

Minh L

17-07-2018

Beatrix Holland

17-07-2018

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Natalie Vieux

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Jay

17-07-2018

hzbloke

17-07-2018

Young Mi

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Poseidon

13-07-2018

LM77

12-07-2018

Dorian Cooper

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JOHN KOSMAS

12-07-2018

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Jimmy

12-07-2018

slayden

11-07-2018

Mert

11-07-2018

AlPacinoInvestor

11-07-2018

Unidentifieduser23

11-07-2018

jeremy Westell

11-07-2018

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Karthick Ramachandran

11-07-2018

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cantoncapital

11-07-2018

John Stephen

07-07-2018

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flobby

05-07-2018

Alison Roache

04-07-2018

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Paul Creighton ATF Creighton Holdings Trust

04-07-2018

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Henry Ng

04-07-2018

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Kayman

03-07-2018

Ram Valia

02-07-2018

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Akash Goyal

02-07-2018

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Raj Bhattarai

02-07-2018

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Thomas V

02-07-2018

Douglas Spiegelhauer

02-07-2018

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ASK

02-07-2018

krish

02-07-2018

Marc Hillary

02-07-2018

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Thomas Nador

01-07-2018

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Vejune Zemaityte

30-06-2018

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Augusto Jacquier

30-06-2018

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Hayley

30-06-2018

Milko

29-06-2018

sue stephen

28-06-2018

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Lisa Brincat

28-06-2018

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Cinema Fan

27-06-2018

 


 


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